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Author Topic: "Grid"  (Read 15894 times)

Windswept

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"Grid"
« on: July 01, 2011, 06:44:08 pm »
In cases where an individual is within a few days or even months of the next higher age category on the so-called "grid," SSA can use the next higher category if there are additional adversities beyond the RFC and vocational factors already considered.  That's the short answer.

For more detail as to how they handle borderline age situations, go to

https://secure.ssa.gov/apps10/poms.nsf/lnx/0425015005

and scroll down to sections C.4. and D.
_____

Incidentally the appendix 2 medical-vocational rules was christened with the nym "grid" by advocacy attorneys when the rules were published as an NPRM in the Federal Register in 1978.  The nym is not an SSA construct.

Dragon Fly

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Re: Borderline Age Situations
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2011, 07:59:57 pm »
Bumping.
>;<
"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music." --  Friedrich Nietzsche

kudu

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Re: Borderline Age Situations
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2011, 12:27:52 pm »
By SSA guidelines am I 54 years old or 56?
I was 56 when I applied on 3/22/11 but I put my disability date as 9/1/09 when I was 54 and 10 months old. The way I understand it SSA will us the age 54 but may consider moving me into advanced age.

Windswept

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Re: Borderline Age Situations
« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2011, 03:00:18 pm »
They won't put you into the next age category (advanced age, 55-59) unless there are additional vocational adversities beyond those considered in your RFC and vocational factors or they establish a later onset of disability.

However, this age business only comes into play at step 5 of the sequential evaluation process, i,e., determining whether you can do other kinds of work than you did in the past.  If your impairment satisfies the medical Listings, you will be allowed without any consideration of age or the other vocational factors. - - Jack

Dragon Fly

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Re: Borderline Age Situations
« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2011, 10:46:50 pm »
Hi kudu...welcome to the site!!!

When possible please fill in some info into your profile so we can answer your questions more efficiently...we look forward to learning more about you!

>;<
Dragon Fly
"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music." --  Friedrich Nietzsche

Windswept

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"Grid"
« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2011, 11:15:11 am »
In the "Grid" project, you may want to borrow some SSR language to explain how the rules work when limitations fall within or between ranges of work:

http://www.ssa.gov/OP_Home/rulings/di/02/SSR83-12-di-02.html

and how they are used when there are only nonexertional limitations, such as may result from a mental impairment:

http://www.ssa.gov/OP_Home/rulings/di/02/SSR85-15-di-02.html

and how they work when there is a combination of exertional and nonexertional limitations:

http://www.ssa.gov/OP_Home/rulings/di/02/SSR83-14-di-02.html

Perhaps a footnote to advise that the constitutionality of the rules was tested before SCOTUS in the Campbell case:

http://www.ssa.gov/OP_Home/rulings/di/02/SSR83-46-di-02.html
__________

SSA attempted a major revision to the "Grid" about five years ago, e.g., advanced age would be raised to 57-62 to reflect the reality that people are living and working longer and also because full retirement age is no longer 65 for most people under SSA's rules for SSRI benefits.  They did publish it as an NPRM in the Fed. Register but public outcry caused them to withdraw it. - - Jack

Pammi

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Re: "Grid"
« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2012, 09:12:31 am »
 :Other25:
Ok I have read much on the grid rules which if followed should help many get though all this SSDI process I myself I think will benefit from it I am 59 yrs cannot do last job and HS only education no skills so what might you all think right now I am waiting applied in Jan 2012 just heard my claim is at Quality review but think it was approved first local office kinda said when I asked this week if it was she answered it is not disapproved wait now

PAMMI

Dragon Fly

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Re: "Grid"
« Reply #7 on: June 15, 2012, 08:59:06 pm »
Welcome to the site, Pammi.

With all things SSA,  :SSA01:.

Hope you hear some good news soon.

>;<
Dragon Fly
"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music." --  Friedrich Nietzsche

whatapain

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Re: "Grid"
« Reply #8 on: July 31, 2012, 10:15:06 am »
Hi everyone , just wondering if the grids help someone thats only done heavy work and is over age 55 .  :Main01:

Trajector Media

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Re: "Grid"
« Reply #9 on: July 31, 2012, 01:06:05 pm »
What is your education level?
I speak from experience not expertise.

Nittany168

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Re: "Grid"
« Reply #10 on: July 31, 2012, 05:50:50 pm »
How can I  find out what Level of work SSA decided  I could do.  Because my denial letter states that your condition results in some limitations in your ability to preform work related activities.  While your not capable of performing work you have done in the past(I've only had one job in 30 yrs), you are able to preform work that is less demanding.  My previous work is at a medium exertion level, unskilled, HS education.  I'm Guessing that they think i can do light work, even thought i had two Dr's both stating lifting less than 5lbs, one in a RFC, the other in her records.  This is so confusing to me.  I hope my attorney can sort this all out.  I haven't received any response to the reconsideration yet, but I'm not holding my breath. 


Different Perspective

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Re: "Grid"
« Reply #11 on: July 31, 2012, 08:23:47 pm »

You find the limits DDS placed upon your ability to function by reading the case file.  This is contained on a CD that you can obtain.  Since you have engaged an attorney, s/he probably requested and has received, or soon will, receive a copy of the CD.
 
Open the CD and find the Exhibit List Index.  Find the Disability Determination Explanation (probably Exhibit 2A on an initial claim).  Sorry, but this process is not as easy as I made it sound.  Anyway, this will walk you through the DDS analyst’s thought process and, if appropriate, the discussion between the analyst and the medical consultant.  Part of that explanation will include the RFC established and a list of jobs the applicant can perform with that RFC. 

(What benefit do you think you will receive by knowing this information?  This is what the attorney does.  S/he reads the relevant parts of the case record and picks them apart for weaknesses that need to be addressed – either at the reconsideration level, or the Hearing level. )

Nittany168

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Re: "Grid"
« Reply #12 on: July 31, 2012, 10:31:07 pm »
Thank you DP, I haven't asked the attorney if he has the CD yet, but I plan to.  I was curious since it was stated in my denial letter my limitations keep me from doing my past Work.  So I guess either they decided I could do light or sedentary work.  If its sedentary work then wouldn't I be considered disabled by using the grid, or am I misunderstanding the Grid??  I'm 52 years old, GED, the job I've held for the past 30 years was unskilled, medium exertion. 

By them stating that I could not do my past work, I guess that they didn't pay too much attention to what the medical CE Dr reported.  Reading his report you'd think I'd be able to do cart wheels, and back flips.  My MRI's and my Dr's RFC paint a very different picture.  I guess I'm just miffed that I have to pay someone to do a range of motion test to counter the CE, Ugh.

Thank you DP for all you do to help us.  Its not always what we want to hear,but it's what we need to hear.

Different Perspective

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Re: "Grid"
« Reply #13 on: August 01, 2012, 06:03:33 am »
Nittany168
Age, education, prior work experience (including potential transferability of work skills), and residual functional capacity all play a part in SSA’s perceived ability to learn to perform other than past work. 

If your RFC is light, Grid Rule 202.13 directs a determination of not disabled.
If your RFC is Sed., Grid Rule 201.12 directs a determination of disabled.

The burden of proof rests with you.  It will be up to your attorney to convince the ALJ that you cannot perform Light work.  MRI’s do not prove you can/cannot perform any type of work.  All the MRI does is show you do/do not have a Medically Determinable Impairment that could logically cause the functional limits you allege.  Proof of the extent of the limits comes from other sources – your doctor statements are important but not automatically proof.  This is where your attorney will earn his keep. 

Yes, you may have to pay for further proof.  Some representatives want a Functional Capacity Evaluation; others do not believe they help.  A FCE will be a multi-hour, maybe as long as 2 days, evaluation performed by a physical therapist who will objectively measure your capacity to lift, walk, bend, sit, reach, etc. 

whatapain

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Re: "Grid"
« Reply #14 on: August 01, 2012, 07:30:48 am »
Hi Marci, My education level is High school .