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Author Topic: Kidney Failure and Disability  (Read 3110 times)

newdawn

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Re: Kidney Failure and Disability
« Reply #15 on: February 16, 2021, 05:32:46 pm »
If you are approved for SSDI but are not receiving dialysis. You have to wait 24 months for your Medicare to kick in.

I would still have insurance on SSDI for those 24 months till I can apply for Medicare...is that correct or am I confused?

I think you may be a bit confused. Or perhaps we confused you.

You only can begin receiving Medicare either at age 65 or once you have received 24 months of SSDI monthly benefits....

EXCEPTION: For those with ESRD (end stage renal disease) who are either on DIALYSIS or who are undergoing a kidney transplant (I think they mean, actually undergoing the transplant (the month of the surgery), not waiting for one). Those people on dialysis or undergoing a kidney transplant are eligible as soon for medicare as soon as they get approved for SSDI. So they don't have to wait 24 months.

Additionally, those with ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease) also do not have the 24-month waiting period for medicare.

Those are the only scenarios I'm aware of that don't require the 24 months of SSDI benefits before medicare begins.

So I would have to find insurance coverage for that 24 months if I didnt go the cobra route thru my job...

Just to reiterate, I never did the COBRA thing. It's just that some companies apparently keep employees "on the rolls" even while they're on LTD so in cases like that, you just keep getting your regular health insurance like always.

If your employer is not-so-nice and fires you once you go on LTD, then I believe your only options are COBRA or insurance through the marketplace (usually the marketplace will steer you to medicaid if you qualify financially and your state expanded medicaid, etc.).

As an aside, there are some "non-traditional" non-insurance options (NON-insurance being the operative word), but I personally don't recommend this path based on someone my mom knows who went this route for a time. It was strange and definitely NOT insurance as the woman came to find out once she actually needed help paying some medical bills.
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Just Me

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Re: Kidney Failure and Disability
« Reply #16 on: February 16, 2021, 06:48:38 pm »
Some states sell plans that are short term and cheaper. Unfortunately,those plans do not have the ACA protections the ones at the Market Place have. You can talk to a insurance agent in your area about the plans that are available in your state.
Nerve damage in upper and lower extremities. Degenerative Disc Disease, RA.

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shaks24

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Re: Kidney Failure and Disability
« Reply #17 on: February 17, 2021, 06:22:58 am »
I've been on dialysis for a little over 7 years now. I did about 6 years of Peritoneal Dialysis then recently (last August) had to switch to Hemo Dialysis when my PD Catheter failed and 3 surgeries could not correct the failure. I got approved for SSDI on initial application very quickly. However, I was not working and I was already on Peritoneal Dialysis when I applied. As for Medicare, it was effective from the first month I started home dialysis. If you do in center hemo dialysis, there is a 3 month delay before medicare kicks in. Also it would be wise to have additional insurance to cover the 20% of dialysis costs that medicare does not cover. Either insurance from an employer or a gap policy. Gap policies have very high premiums if you are under 65 but in most states you get a guaranteed issue window of 6 months within the date you qualified for medicare. Unfortunately gap policies are controlled by the states so the situation varies state by state. 7 years ago I got my medigap F policy for 280 a month. It is now 774 a month but I virually have no medical bills besides my premiums and a few drug copays with my medicare D prescription plan. Recently federal law has allowed dialysis patients to sign up for medicare advantage plans with no exceptions. So that is an option too but you will encounter strict networks, co pays, and likely require pre approval for certain services.  I feel safer with the original medicare and a gap policy. When I turn 65 I will get another open enrollment for a gap policy that will be at the same premium rate that other 65 year olds get. It will save me hundreds a month on my gap premium if I make it to 65. LOL. I will be 62 later this year. If I can answer any questions based on my experiences over the last 7 years please just ask. I will do my best to answer. Right now....If I were you I would research home dialysis options vs in center hemo dialysis. Your nephrologist can even arrange for you to visit a dialysis clinic and ask questions. Both Davita and Fresenius also have a crash course presentation on dialysis options. At least they did 7 years ago. I attended the Fresenius one and ended up using them for both PD and hemo. Good luck to you.

shaks24

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Re: Kidney Failure and Disability
« Reply #18 on: February 17, 2021, 07:01:45 am »
Oh, just one more piece of advice. Assuming you will have to wait a good while to get a transplant (which is the norm) You want to start dialysis on your own terms. If you suddenly get sick and have to start they will put a catheter in your neck area that goes into a major vein. In order to do either PD or Hemo you will need a dialysis access. For hemo its called an AV Fistula. They surgically join a vein and an artery in either your upper or lower non dominant arm and then after it matures for a couple months it bulges out and becomes a super vein that can move the high volume of blood required for hemo dialysis. For PD they surgically place a catheter in your abdomen. Typically it has to heal for about 4 weeks before it can be used. When its ready it's used to fill and drain dialysis fluid from your abdominal cavity. The fluid absorbs excess water and toxins from your body and cleans your system. So my point is that if you are in stage 5 kidney failure that means your function is 15% or below. You need to be ready as an access takes time to be ready to use unless you want to go with the neck catheter which is the worst option because of infection risks. Whatever you do will seem overwhelming initially but with both PD and hemo you learn the game and it eventually becomes routine but its a battle and you will be a dialysis warrior.

dolphindan1

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Re: Kidney Failure and Disability
« Reply #19 on: February 17, 2021, 06:50:22 pm »
Oh, just one more piece of advice. Assuming you will have to wait a good while to get a transplant (which is the norm) You want to start dialysis on your own terms. If you suddenly get sick and have to start they will put a catheter in your neck area that goes into a major vein. In order to do either PD or Hemo you will need a dialysis access. For hemo its called an AV Fistula. They surgically join a vein and an artery in either your upper or lower non dominant arm and then after it matures for a couple months it bulges out and becomes a super vein that can move the high volume of blood required for hemo dialysis. For PD they surgically place a catheter in your abdomen. Typically it has to heal for about 4 weeks before it can be used. When its ready it's used to fill and drain dialysis fluid from your abdominal cavity. The fluid absorbs excess water and toxins from your body and cleans your system. So my point is that if you are in stage 5 kidney failure that means your function is 15% or below. You need to be ready as an access takes time to be ready to use unless you want to go with the neck catheter which is the worst option because of infection risks. Whatever you do will seem overwhelming initially but with both PD and hemo you learn the game and it eventually becomes routine but its a battle and you will be a dialysis warrior.

Thank you for all that info

shaks24

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Re: Kidney Failure and Disability
« Reply #20 on: February 17, 2021, 07:20:11 pm »
I know its kind of direct and blunt but its all the truth. Please don't hesitate to ask me any questions in the forum or by PM. I think I have experienced pretty much everything you can with dialysis. At least it seems that way to me. I left out one more treatment option. That would be home hemo dialysis but typically they require that you have a care partner that can help with placement and removal of the needles for treatments. When you get to the point where you have severe brain fog, itchy skin, fatigue and nausea you will know its time to start dialysis. There is no cure for kidney failure. Only treatment through dialysis or kidney transplantation to substitute for the cleaning of the blood and the removal of excess water from the body that normal kidneys do. One day they will come out with the artificial kidney and that will be a great day for all of us with this condition.

SteelCity1981

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Re: Kidney Failure and Disability
« Reply #21 on: February 17, 2021, 08:00:11 pm »
They are real close to coming out with wearable artificial  kidneys. Within the next few years they will probably be out on the market. I think artificial implants kidneys will follow  suit after that.  I'm not to keen on stem cell rejuvenation therapy just yet for major organs.  Even though there has been some progress in that area  it's been very slow. we are still years away from that becoming a proven reality imo. Bionic technology seems to be a lot more closer to reality in the short term than stem cell rejuvenation therapy is for major organs.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2021, 08:02:36 pm by SteelCity1981 »