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Author Topic: What is the "Blue Book"?  (Read 18080 times)

Sharbear50

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What is the "Blue Book"?
« on: October 31, 2010, 05:44:51 am »
I have read a few posts that suggest using this. What is it? Where is it?
Sharon
Sharon
I wish I had land - grow food

shado1021

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Re: What is the "Blue Book"?
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2010, 06:22:34 am »
SSA's Blue Book lists the medical and mental impairments that qualify for disability.  It's broken down by body systems and states the criteria they look for in each condition.
Keep in mind, that even if your condition is not listed, you can still get disability.  But you have to prove that your disability prevents you from working.  You can find it here:

http://www.ssa.gov/disability/professionals/bluebook/AdultListings.htm

Shaun

Sharbear50

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Re: What is the "Blue Book"?
« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2010, 06:41:00 am »
Shaun,
Thank you. I will look it up.
Sharon
I wish I had land - grow food

Trajector Media

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Re: What is the "Blue Book"?
« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2010, 07:18:33 am »
Sharon,
     What a beautiful couple you are.  

     I think the blue book is such an important thing to understand.  When I applied for Disability and all of my subsequent appeals, I did not even know the blue book existed.  That is one of the reasons I always say if I had an attorney I think I would have received my  benefits a lot sooner.  If you can tie your disability into the blue book and prove it based on their own guidelines they have no choice but to approve you.  That is what most of the members on this site that were approved on their initial applications did.  It is important, if you are going to represent yourself, to completely understand how a decision is made so you can almost make it for them in your paperwork.  I am so glad you are researching all of this information.  It really will help you.  
  
     The other thing you want to understand is the "grid".  It is a bit of a nightmare but here is the link:  http://www.ssa.gov/OP_Home/cfr20/404/404-app-p02.htm .  You have to look at your age, education,how much you can lift  and prior work experience.  It will tell you whether you will be found disabled or not.  It can be a bit confusing.  Please take a look at that and the blue book and please feel free to ask anything as I know it can be hard to understand.
Marci
« Last Edit: July 17, 2012, 02:49:14 pm by Bonzai »
I speak from experience not expertise.

razzle51

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Re: What is the "Blue Book"?
« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2012, 01:41:18 pm »
that last link that was posted does not work

Bonzai

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Re: What is the "Blue Book"?
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2012, 02:49:53 pm »
Should work now - SSA must have changed the link
"If one of these engines fails, how far will the other one take us?"
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injured 82airborne

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Re: What is the "Blue Book"?
« Reply #6 on: July 18, 2012, 02:07:46 am »
General Guidelines

To qualify for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), you must have worked and paid into the program (mandatory payroll taxes) for five of the last 10 years.
You must also have been disabled before reaching full-retirement age (65-67), and you must meet Social Security's definition of disability. The Social Security Administration (SSA) uses a process called sequential evaluation to determine who receives benefits.

Here is an explanation of Social Security's five-step process to determine if an individual qualifies for SSDI benefits:
1. Determine if an individual is "working (engaging in substantial gainful activity)" according to the SSA definition. Earning more than $1,000 a month as an employee is enough to be disqualified from receiving Social Security disability benefits.
2. Conclude the disability must be severe enough to significantly limit one's ability to perform basic work activities needed to do most jobs. For example:
Walking, standing, sitting, lifting, pushing, pulling, reaching, carrying or handling
Seeing, hearing and speaking
Understanding/carrying out and remembering simple instructions
Responding appropriately to supervision, co-workers and usual work situations
Dealing with changes in a routine work setting
3. Ask if the disability meets or equals a medical listing.
4. Explore the ability of an individual to perform work he has done in the past despite his disability. If the SSA finds that a person can do his past work, benefits are denied. If the person cannot, then the process proceeds to the fifth and final step.
5. Review age, education, work experience and physical/mental condition to determine what other work, if any, the person can perform. To determine disability, the SSA enlists medical-vocational rules, which vary according to age.

Dragon Fly

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Re: What is the "Blue Book"?
« Reply #7 on: July 18, 2012, 06:45:44 pm »
that last link that was posted does not work

Welcome razzle.
 :Welcome06:
"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music." --  Friedrich Nietzsche

PsiJet79

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Re: What is the "Blue Book"?
« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2012, 04:57:32 am »
Just thought I would bump this back up because of the blue book aspect. Plus also, I read through it and 'listed' all the ones that are going on with me.

Remind me never to do that again because I didn't realize I could be classified in so many parts!

8.04
8.05
12.04 (In parts: (A1c/e/f/g)(2a/b/c/e/f))
12.06 (In parts: (A1a/b/d)(B1/2/3/4))
14.08k
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Fordman

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Re: What is the "Blue Book"?
« Reply #9 on: December 05, 2012, 08:52:23 am »
Just thought I would bump this back up because of the blue book aspect. Plus also, I read through it and 'listed' all the ones that are going on with me.

Remind me never to do that again because I didn't realize I could be classified in so many parts!

8.04
8.05
12.04 (In parts: (A1c/e/f/g)(2a/b/c/e/f))



12.06 (In parts: (A1a/b/d)(B1/2/3/4))
14.08k




I was approved for blue book listing 4.12b I have peferial artery disease it is listed in cardiovascular section. My Otr approval even said that I meet listing 4.12b and as far as the grid, had my last job for 30 years so the one about can you do your job that you had for 15 yrs no, and I'm only a high school graduate, and my age was 55. And my letter said I had a excellent work history and that they find me creditable based on that and my vascular surgeon since he is a specialist in PAD. So the blue book listings do work fast only took me a year from start to finish. I have not seen no body except my self get approved just for having peferial vascular disease.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2012, 09:14:14 am by Fordman »

smalltowngirl

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Re: What is the "Blue Book"?
« Reply #10 on: December 05, 2012, 09:03:33 am »
PsiJet79, I thought the same thing when I read thru the whole site.  And now with the mental issues, it makes me think I'm a basketcase!  I fall into sooo many different things, just depends on what the dr.'s say!

DLWyman

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Re: What is the "Blue Book"?
« Reply #11 on: January 18, 2013, 04:03:52 pm »
I found the Blue Book on the SS site a few months ago, I just searched for disability conditions.  I applied for ss disability on Halloween, I called SS today to get a confirmation number so I could access my account on line, but instead the lady told me that a decision was made on my application 2 days ago.  I had a abdominal aortic dissection, that doctors tried to treat with meds but I required surgery a few weeks later, as my aorta had dissected and I was bleeding internally.  My condition is listed in the cardio part of the Blue Book.  Since going through surgery, I have migraine headaches, PTSD, panic attacks,  along with high blood pressure and a few other wonderful conditions.  I am 57 years old, female, and my spouse is disabled and retired, my medications are bankrupting us.  I'm scared that they are going to deny my application, I should know before the end of the month...please wish me luck with this.

mike70

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Re: What is the "Blue Book"?
« Reply #12 on: January 18, 2013, 05:40:44 pm »
I found the Blue Book on the SS site a few months ago, I just searched for disability conditions.  I applied for ss disability on Halloween, I called SS today to get a confirmation number so I could access my account on line, but instead the lady told me that a decision was made on my application 2 days ago.  I had a abdominal aortic dissection, that doctors tried to treat with meds but I required surgery a few weeks later, as my aorta had dissected and I was bleeding internally.  My condition is listed in the cardio part of the Blue Book.  Since going through surgery, I have migraine headaches, PTSD, panic attacks,  along with high blood pressure and a few other wonderful conditions.  I am 57 years old, female, and my spouse is disabled and retired, my medications are bankrupting us.  I'm scared that they are going to deny my application, I should know before the end of the month...please wish me luck with this.
I know some of your ailments are in the blue book,have a pile of doc reports faxed to lawyer.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2013, 05:48:31 pm by mike70 »

Fordman

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Re: What is the "Blue Book"?
« Reply #13 on: January 18, 2013, 05:53:41 pm »
With the blue book you also have to meet the sub categories of that listing. For me  this is what I had to

meet. My listing was the 4.1b


Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) — also known as peripheral vascular disease, atherosclerosis or hardening of the arteries — is a disorder that occurs in the arteries of the circulatory system. Arteries are the blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrient-rich blood from the heart to all areas of the body. PAD occurs in the arteries that carry blood to the arms and legs.

Healthy arteries have a smooth lining that prevents blood from clotting and promotes steady blood flow. In PAD, the arteries slowly become narrowed or blocked when plaque gradually forms inside the artery walls. Plaque is made of excessive fat, cholesterol and other substances floating through the bloodstream, such as inflammatory cells, proteins and calcium. If the arteries become narrowed or blocked, blood cannot get through to nourish organs and other tissues, causing damage to the tissues and eventually tissue death.

The rate at which PAD progresses varies with each individual and depends on many factors, including where in the body the plaque has formed and the person’s overall health.

PAD can build up over a lifetime, and the symptoms may not become obvious until later in life. For many people, the outward symptoms will not appear until the artery has narrowed by 60 percent or more.

The first noticeable symptom of PAD may be intermittent claudication — leg discomfort, pain or cramping that develops with activity, is relieved with rest, and recurs upon resuming activity. The pain is often noticed in the calf, but may also be felt in the buttocks or thighs. Intermittent claudication symptoms may also include numbness, weakness, heaviness or fatigue in the leg muscles when walking that are relieved at rest. The pain can be severe enough to interfere with normal walking. This type of cyclical pain is caused by reduced blood flow to the leg muscles and goes away at rest because the muscles require less blood flow at rest. However, many people with PAD do not have any symptoms.

Social Security reviews PAD claims under a special definition of disability called a listing. The listing number for PAD is 4.12. To meet this listing, you must show that you have PAD as determined by appropriate medically acceptable imaging, causing intermittent claudication and one of the following:

A. Resting ankle/brachial systolic blood pressure ratio of less than 0.50.

OR

B. Decrease in systolic blood pressure at the ankle on exercise of 50 percent or more of pre-exercise level and requiring 10 minutes or more to return to pre-exercise level.

OR

C. Resting toe systolic pressure of less than 30 mm Hg.

OR

D. Resting toe/brachial systolic blood pressure ratio of less than 0.40.

The ankle blood pressure referred to in A and B is the higher of the pressures recorded from the posterior tibial and dorsalis pedis arteries in the affected leg. The higher pressure recorded from the two sites is the more significant measurement in assessing the extent of arterial insufficiency. Techniques for obtaining ankle systolic blood pressures include Doppler, plethysmographic studies, or other techniques. SSA will request any available tracings generated by these studies so that we can review them.

In 4.12A, the ankle/brachial systolic blood pressure ratio is the ratio of the systolic blood pressure at the ankle to the systolic blood pressure at the brachial artery; both taken at the same time while you are lying on your back. SSA does not require that the ankle and brachial pressures be taken on the same side of your body. This is because, as with the ankle pressure, SSA will use the higher brachial systolic pressure measured. Listing 4.12A is met when your resting ankle/brachial systolic blood pressure ratio is less than 0.50. If your resting ankle/brachial systolic blood pressure ratio is 0.50 or above, SSA will use 4.12B to evaluate the severity of your PAD, unless you also have a disease causing abnormal arterial calcification or small vessel disease, such as diabetes mellitus.

SSA will use resting toe systolic blood pressures or resting toe/brachial systolic blood pressure ratios (determined the same way as ankle/brachial ratios) when you have intermittent claudication and a disease that results in abnormal arterial calcification (for example, Monckeberg’s sclerosis or diabetes mellitus) or small vessel disease (for example, diabetes mellitus). These diseases may result in misleadingly high blood pressure readings at the ankle. However, high blood pressures due to vascular changes related to these diseases seldom occur at the toe level. While the criteria in 4.12C and 4.12D are intended primarily for individuals who have a disease causing abnormal arterial calcification or small vessel disease, SSA may also use them for evaluating anyone with PAD.




Criszilla

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Re: What is the "Blue Book"?
« Reply #14 on: January 18, 2013, 07:44:08 pm »
...I am 57 years old, female, and my spouse is disabled and retired, my medications are bankrupting us.  I'm scared that they are going to deny my application, I should know before the end of the month...please wish me luck with this.

Welcome, DLWyman.  Wishing nothing but the best for you and your husband.   :Welcome08: