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Author Topic: Therapy forever?  (Read 4209 times)

imfinallyhere

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Therapy forever?
« on: February 12, 2018, 04:13:05 pm »
If a person has had therapy for a long time, is it likely that they will also require mental health services when they become seniors?  Do some people get better or level out or do people just stop seeing mental health providers as they age?  I rarely see older clients in the waiting rooms of these clinics, if ever.

Different Perspective

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Re: Therapy forever?
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2018, 09:29:34 pm »
"...is it likely that they will also require mental health services when they become seniors?"

Who is "they"?  If you mean SSA, "they" will never require a recipient to participate in any type of treatment.  "They" may, however, opine that lack of treatment equals Medical Improvement.  Whether, or not, that MI would be enough to allow Substantial Gainful Activity is a question that cannot be answered until the time comes.

pattysofty

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Re: Therapy forever?
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2018, 09:43:29 pm »
"...is it likely that they will also require mental health services when they become seniors?"

Who is "they"?  If you mean SSA, "they" will never require a recipient to participate in any type of treatment.  "They" may, however, opine that lack of treatment equals Medical Improvement.  Whether, or not, that MI would be enough to allow Substantial Gainful Activity is a question that cannot be answered until the time comes.

Ah! Good point as usual. I was thinking something similar, but didn't know how to word it.

Oh. let me add this. I have been getting therapy for ten years and it doesn't help. However, it at least gives me an outlet to speak to someone about my. Also, not going to therapy can cost me come CDR time.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2018, 09:55:41 pm by pattysofty »

SFVLance

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Re: Therapy forever?
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2018, 09:45:56 pm »
Do some people get better or level out or do people just stop seeing mental health providers as they age?

Some people definitely get better, and some people just stop seeing providers. That happens across all ages, but I know that's not the point of your question.

In either case, a person is supposed to report that they are no longer receiving treatment, and yes, that could lead to new questions from the SSA if the claimant is still trying to receive SSDI benefits.
Los Angeles, CA

Short Version: Filed June 2012 at age 46; major depression + general anxiety. Denied all the way. Fed district court remanded, 2nd hearing delayed twice (11 months total delay). Bench approval at remand hearing in March 2017. Took over six months to receive closed-period award pymt.

imfinallyhere

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Re: Therapy forever?
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2018, 10:03:31 pm »
Ah! Good point as usual. I was thinking something similar, but didn't know how to word it.

Oh. let me add this. I have been getting therapy for ten years and it doesn't help. However, it at least gives me an outlet to speak to someone about my.
It has helped me when it has been a good provider.  It has been a safe place for me.  When the provider wasn't so good or the chemistry wasn't that good, it has been neutral or even bad.

Just Me

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Re: Therapy forever?
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2018, 10:05:58 pm »
When your SSDI converts to Social Security Retirement. You will no longer have CDR.
Nerve damage in upper and lower extremities. Degenerative Disc Disease, RA.

Hope the size of a mustard seed can produce Faith that can move mountains.

imfinallyhere

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Re: Therapy forever?
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2018, 10:12:10 pm »
Some people definitely get better, and some people just stop seeing providers. That happens across all ages, but I know that's not the point of your question.

In either case, a person is supposed to report that they are no longer receiving treatment, and yes, that could lead to new questions from the SSA if the claimant is still trying to receive SSDI benefits.
Hi, SFVLance.  The first paragraph I quoted was what I was getting at.  Since this is the Comfort Zone section of the forum, I thought I'd put this out there as a general question and not so much as it relates to receiving benefits which convert to regular SS retirement.  It's tough to visualize being in therapy almost continuously, and I'm referring to mental health services even a good ways past standard retirement age.  Some days, I really struggle with this. 

BRBB

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Re: Therapy forever?
« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2018, 10:34:21 pm »
Many "seniors" go thru many changes that could possibly be a cause to why us geezers don't need 'therapy' as often, or not at all.

We are no longer working. So our need to deal with working and playing well with others, in a workplace environment, no longer applies on a full time 40+ hour a week job. We often no longer have the stresses associated with raising a family.

Our bodies change, and chemical imbalances often level out as us geezers go thru "the change", male & female.With a full-time job in the rear view mirror, we often find ourselves surrounded by those that we "want" to be around, in lieu of what we had to be around during our working years.

I'm sure there are a plethora of reasons why us seniors often seek out therapy less as we age. Since my issues are all physical, I'd kill to have mine go away with age. But alas, it is not to be.

If therapy benefits you, and it is within your budget, why wouldn't you continue?

Best wishes,

BRBB

« Last Edit: February 12, 2018, 10:37:56 pm by BRBB »

SFVLance

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Re: Therapy forever?
« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2018, 10:35:04 pm »
Sorry, I didn't even notice that this was in the Comfort Zone section!

Well I certainly wish you luck. I know that some days are unbearable; I struggled with severe depression and generalized anxiety, and was only able to conquer them (or at least get a handle on them) through medication, therapy and honesty.

Finding the right combo of meds itself can take awhile, as can finding pdocs you are comfortable with. Recovery (?), if any,  is impossible to time: it can take a few months or several years...no one knows. But the important thing is you are still trying and still getting help, so you are on the right path.

Los Angeles, CA

Short Version: Filed June 2012 at age 46; major depression + general anxiety. Denied all the way. Fed district court remanded, 2nd hearing delayed twice (11 months total delay). Bench approval at remand hearing in March 2017. Took over six months to receive closed-period award pymt.

Helper

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Re: Therapy forever?
« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2018, 10:43:11 pm »
I think some seniors may also have trouble accessing services.  For example, if they do not drive they need to get someone to take them or take a bus or Paratransit & may decide it is not worth the effort.

Seniors in nursing facilities can get therapists to come to them, if needed.
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needssi

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Re: Therapy forever?
« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2018, 10:54:04 pm »
Well although I saw a psychiatrist for six years, then a nurse practitioner in the same group for the last six months (had to change due to Medi-Cal) I had my first official therapy appointment today with a young female psychologist.  I am 58 1/2 years old.  The psychiatrist did at least talk a little with me each visit but the NP does not do any talk at all.  So I have never been "in therapy" before. 

This therapist is very young.  She only has six years experience and only does it part time now that she has a baby.  I chose her for the first reason.  I thought that perhaps someone with a more recent education would be a little more open to various types of therapy.  I also chose a PSYD vs PHD.  Because the first focuses more on actual clinical therapy whereas the PHD's focus is a lot more on research, etc.  Too early to tell how it will go with her.  I talked my full hour today and I look forward to my next visit.  She seemed very nice and engaged in the session.  I actually like that she does NOT take notes or record the session.  That being said I wonder how the notes will look at time goes on.  She said she goes off of her really good memory and does all of the documentation the same day. 

Going to see her once every two weeks or so and continue to see my NP for meds once a month or so.  So I guess I am the opposite of the "norm" for just starting therapy at an advanced age.  And since I don't have any family, not married, no kids, etc. it is mostly to try and cope with the wonderful life I had and lost due to physical and mental impairments that began in 2009. 

Oh and starting with my next visit (and upcoming other doctor appointments) I am going to take full advantage of a new program CalOptima (Medicaid which is Medi-Cal in CA and CalOptima is who administers it in my county) which offers FREE RIDES to and from ALL appointments for covered services.  This just started late last year.  So no more having to plan out long bus trips and a lot of walking.  It's like Uber/Lyft for Medicaid patients.  Not sure if it is just here or if all of Medi-Cal in CA offers it but thought it was worth mentioning in case anyone here is in CA and could benefit from it.  I haven't driven since 2009 and now that I have lost everything (including my two cars) I don't have anything to drive regardless.

needssi

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Re: Therapy forever?
« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2018, 10:55:50 pm »
Helper was posting at the same time I was...indeed that is why I wanted to mention it here.  It is for ALL covered services (doctors, labs and even pharmacy trips (mine delivers so don't need that last one).

Just Me

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Re: Therapy forever?
« Reply #12 on: February 12, 2018, 11:01:54 pm »
Transportation to and from medical appointments is a Federal Mandatory Medicaid Benefit. Transportation to and from the pharmacy is not a Federal Mandatory Medicaid Benefit.

Nerve damage in upper and lower extremities. Degenerative Disc Disease, RA.

Hope the size of a mustard seed can produce Faith that can move mountains.

needssi

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Re: Therapy forever?
« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2018, 11:26:01 pm »
I believe that (FEDERAL LAW) was and maybe still is only MEDICAL transportation.  This is considered NON MEDICAL transportation even though you are going to medical type appointments.  Meaning that there it is not on the special "access" vans, etc. for handicapped people (wheelchairs) or people with severe mental/learning disabilities that are unable to use public transportation.   

I know this because when I first got on Medi-Cal I checked into it.  And yes they are required to provide MEDICAL transportation for those that qualify.  I did NOT qualify because I was able mind and body enough to take a bus/local transportation.  The "new" part is that now it is transportation for those of us that CAN ride a bus but that paying the bus fare is out of reach or that need door to door service but are fine to ride in regular cars, able to get in and out, etc.  Like Uber/Lyft, the drivers use their own cars, etc.  But it is 100% free.  So since I had inquired back then, when the new program began in November 2017, I was contacted by my nurse case manager and encouraged to apply.

You have to call CalOptima directly and they determine your benefits and if you are qualified for the NON medical transportation.  Then after 48 business hours, you call another number they give you to actually arrange the trips.  You can either schedule a fixed time for your return home trips OR (what I do) call when you are ready to be picked up.  I never know how long I'll be in my appointments and obviously they don't wait there for you.  But I've used it once so far and it was pretty good.  You can call very soon to the pickup and ask the type of car, color, driver male or female, etc.  Although on my return trip the car that picked me up was NOT the one they described, guess there was someone else closer.

needssi

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Re: Therapy forever?
« Reply #14 on: February 12, 2018, 11:29:47 pm »
I should add that there may have been some sort of reimbursement opportunity before covering bus passes, never checked into that one.  But when my doctor said I needed to go to the ER, they called me a regular taxi that took me there.  Then when I was discharged from the hospital two days later, the hospital called and covered the taxi ride home.  No way I was going to take a bus home far away on a Friday night when I was still very ill.  So ask and you shall receive (sometimes  :Main09:)